Categories
Opinion

Web design questions: Here’s what to ask before starting out

A lot of web designing is routine for millions of companies and freelancers. But not all tasks are easy; many warrant long spells spent in battling complex problems.

As a web designer, a checklist of questions to ask your clients can pre-empt many hassles along the way.

With the right answers, you can create a documented set of requirements to guide yourself through a web design project.

Detailed here are five key questions web designers need to ask their clients:

Q 1. What exactly is your profession or business interest?

Knowing the answer to this question will help designers finalize the right combination of shapes, colors and typography on the site.

A dentist may want to infuse a refreshing mint feel in the minds of visitors. A gift shop will want to instantly ignite the joy of giving. A lawyer will want a distraction-free interface to bring his clients straight to the services they need.

You as a designer will need to study a little about your client’s work and stretch your imagination.

Q 2. Who are your competitors?

Your client is very likely to have competitors. Insist on knowing who they are, and create something better and simpler than them.

Competition is a healthy thing – it forces us to raise the bar and evolve.

Q 3. Have you identified example web designs?

Emulating other successful players in your arena is a great idea. A photographer might find appeal in a Pinterest-like design. Someone else may love the soft, tiled design brought about by the metro-style UI.

You might want to give your own recommendations based on this response. For instance, your client’s example site has a slider, but you could convince him that a short video to welcome visitors will be far more pleasant.

Q 4. Are you going to provide text, images and the logo?

If your client’s answer is yes, make sure you are addressing copyright concerns where appropriate. Also, insist on high quality images.

If you are asked to create a logo, ponder over your client’s response to Q1 and work towards creating a memorable icon.

Q 5. What is your budget?

Ask for a ballpark range for the budget to help yourself or your team figure out the right approach.

What if the desired web design requires you to mobilise rare and expensive JavaScript ninjas? Your client’s budget will help you decide.

Bonus!

Are you looking for more checklists and questionnaires to streamline your efforts? Take a look at this diligently compiled article by Cameron Chapman on Smashing Magazine, which is among the web’s most widely-respected authorities on web design.

In Conclusion…

Websites can be designed using innumerable approaches. Some people might consider using pre-cast building blocks delivered through software, while others may use a more powerful and flexible strategy that involves delving deep into code and making changes at will.

Whatever the case, this is a truly exciting exercise. But just like professional sport, you cannot win alone – ample answers and clear communication from clients will pave the way for success.

Categories
WordCamps

WordCamp Pune 2013: ‘The best WordCamp so far in India’

If I’m asked to choose one word to describe the recently concluded WordCamp Pune 2013, I’d pick ‘enriching’.

It was the second time I’d been to a WordCamp, the first one being Cuttack last year, where I spoke about my blogging journey.

A couple of key speakers at the event aptly dubbed this the ‘best ever so far’ in India. Majority of the speeches had more substance than platitudes.

In this article, I’m going to try and capture the most significant happenings of the 2-day event.

Day 1

The first day’s sessions were aimed at developers. It began with King Sidharth talking about the need for responsive designs.

This is his slideshow:
Savita Soni talked about the power of WP_Query. Below is the complete slideshow: I found Saurabh Shukla’s talk the most inspiring. He described his journey towards building plugins for WordPress. Saurabh later pointed out that there are few WordPress plugin developers in India, and that he hoped to motivate his listeners to take up the practice. Here’s the complete slideshow titled Developing open source WordPress plugins: The art, science and Zen (fonts are bit messed up):   Gaurav Singh spoke about WordPress security, a subject which was dealt with again the next day by Rohit Srivastwa. This is his slideshow:   Aniket Pant talked about Metaboxes:

Thinking of getting your theme into the WordPress theme respository? Take a look at Nisha Singh’s presentation:

Vireendra Tikhe presented his views with a presentation titled “Responsive and Responsible Themes” :

Day 2:

The second day was aimed at bloggers and marketers.

It began with Arun Prabhudesai, owner of Trak.in showering praise on WordPress, while presenting key use cases for the platform. One of the top highlights was the advice that one can “start selling within 24 hours of installing an e-commerce plugin”. Arun, by the way, is a person I respect as one of my top blogging mentors.

The next session by Ronak Thakkar had a similar theme, with the title ‘Leveraging Your Business with WordPress’. Ronak did a fine job by getting the audience to participate early on.

His own accounts of the session and day are a must-read.

Further in the day, cyber security expert Rohit Srivastwa of ClubHack presented vital tips on securing a WordPress site.

These were the highlights of his talk:

  1. It is better to use shared hosting with features to handle security.
  2. Most security tips and plugins related to WordPress deal with automated attackers.
  3. Make a list of bad user agents from hacking tools or bots and block them using your site’s .htaccess file.
  4. Consider using service providers that stop bad traffic, that includes botnets.
  5. Keep an eye on the log files on your server to alert yourself when there’s an attack.
  6. Use free scanning tools like the one provided by sucuri.net. There’s a WordPress plugin based on the scan provided by sitecheck.sucuri.net
  7. The free service of CloudFare is excellent in blocking malicious traffic, even though some users claim that it blocks legitimate traffic as well.
  8. A tool called websitedefender helps monitor changes in the front page.
  9. In the event of an attack, rename the old infected WordPress installation and freshly re-install everything.
  10. Use is.gd/cleanup to fix your site after it has been attacked.
  11. Never look for free versions of premium themes. They may have a catch; they could be infected, which means you’ve hacked yourself!
  12. A string of characters known as a password won’t be enough to keep you secure. Even the simplest of passwords is enough, if you use a plugin for 2 factor authentication.
  13. It is important to use SSL to prevent an attacker from breaking in with the use of sniffers.

On the subject of content marketing, I found Adarsh Thampy’s talk very interesting. Here’s the complete slideshow:

In Conclusion….

The biggest benefit derived from conferences such as WordCamp Pune 2013 is the real life networking.

I was fortunate to interact with Saurabh Shukla, Gaurav Singh, Ronak Thakkar, Arun Prabhudesai, Rohit Srivastwa, Nikhil Narkhede and Saket Jajodia.

Some of the proceedings have been captured on Twitter with the hashtag #WCPune2013. Keep an eye on tweets by @saurabhyapapaya for more substance.

And if you want to know the recipe for a successful WordCamp, don’t forget to contact Amit Kumar Singh of AmiWorks!

Categories
Uncategorized

Unlist Your Number from TrueCaller today!

UPDATE July 18, 2013: Approximately 7 months after this article was published, there’s been news that the TrueCaller database has been hacked into by the so-called Syrian Electronic Army. Again, this highlights the need for users to be careful in the choosing the companies with whom they entrust their private data.

TrueCaller is a mobile app and online service that serves as a very large phonebook for reverse phone number lookups. It can be used to augment your own phone’s contact list in your iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Symbian, or BlackBerry device, helping you let know the names of unknown callers. You can test to see which of your or your friends’ numbers are available in their database at www.truecaller.com.

How does it work?

TrueCaller claims to source the caller information present in their database partly from public directories, and partly from “crowdsourced” data.

However, when I checked, their data didn’t seem to come from public directories. I began searching for my friends’ landline and mobile numbers and those of my own as well, and noted a few interesting things:

  1. Sometimes somebody else’s name would prop up. This would probably be a previous owner, or the former name of the person in case of a name change.
  2. Sometimes the company name would be suffixed or prefixed to the name.

This definitely seems to be populated from contact lists of users.

TrueCaller seems to stop here – it doesn’t, for example, seem to retrieve or store users’ locations. Also, it doesn’t support searching by name – you can only search by number. However, what TrueCaller does reveal is still bad enough, and has actually made many users unhappy, as you can see in a Quora thread on this subject.

Removing your Number

Luckily, fixing this privacy issue turns out to be easy. Head over to Unlist your Phone Number to request an automatic unlisting of your number. It took a few hours for my numbers to get unlisted, and I heaved a sigh of relief after that.

Categories
Opinion

SiliconIndia Stealing Content from Lighthouse Insights: Livebloggers Battle the Scourge of Plagiarism

Just under a day ago, I found an appalling phenomenon in my Facebook timeline – A leading online technology magazine focussing on the Indian domain, SiliconIndia, was caught stealing portions of a recent interview published by rising social media blog Lighthouse Insights.

Lighthouse Insights was started in late 2010 by Prasant and Vinaya Naidu with the aim of bonding the community of social media users. I first met Prasant at a meet-up in Pune, and instantly liked the knowledge he had built on the social media scene in India.

You can read the complete account of the theft in one of their posts.

Do News Sites Have the Liberty to Steal?

When the founders of Lighthouse Insights confronted SiliconIndia on Twitter, an incredibly shocking explanation appeared: Plagiarism            

Only the most juvenile of writers could possibly put up such an explanation; I had to remind myself that this was emerging from a well-established media organization that has been around since 1997. The tweet was subsequently deleted, but it was too late as it was retweeted several times and its screenshot began to float around on Facebook.

The founders of Lighthouse Insights decided to battle it out on Twitter to expose the high-profile content thieves after appeals to their CEO and content managers fell on deaf ears. The complete blow-by-blow description of the fight has now appeared in a new blog post on their site.

The battle-cry hashtag #OccupySiliconIndia began to pick up momentum during the early part of the 14th of August, and hit the list of top ten trending hashtags in India by evening. That forced SiliconIndia to sit up and take notice, offering Lighthouse Insights either of two options, of providing due credit, or removing the copied post completely.

The result? The offending post vanished while supporters of the campaign continued discussing possible outcomes. The fight isn’t over; after receiving a bloody nose, SiliconIndia have simply disappeared from the scene instead of announcing an unconditional public apology for the theft and the subsequent distress caused to ardent followers of an insightful new social media blog.

The Scourge of Plagiarism and the Hope from Social Media

Plagiarism has been a perpetual enemy for writers and publishers ever since the introduction of the printing press in the Middle Ages. The matter has become much worse with the arrival of the Information Age, now that just a few keystrokes and mouse-clicks are all that one needs to lift thoroughly-researched material and claim its ownership.

Many web publishers conscious of the lurking thieves invest a significant amount of their time in filing Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA) reports to get Google to de-index plagiarised content, but the cat-and-mouse game continues. Even when such reports are not filed or delayed, search engines are sophisticated enough to ascertain the real thieves. Unfortunately, webmasters may end up on the losing side when their sites are restructured or migrated to new domains, since such changes can confuse search engines.

The Wrath of the Connected World

Will social media come to our rescue? The signs are positive, with the victory of #OccupySiliconIndia – even after SiliconIndia decides to undertake major damage-control exercises, Lighthouse Insights is likely to present this story as one of the most potent case studies showcasing the vast power of social media. Publishers, no matter how big or small, must now realize the importance of original content and think twice before facing the wrath of the masses in a connected world.

What are your thoughts about the battle against plagiarism? Please feel free to use the comment form below and speak your mind!